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UO Student Conduct and Community Standards
Frequently Asked Questions

The Office of Student Conduct and Community Standards, a department of the Office of the Dean of Students, created this guide to assist you in helping your student navigate the student conduct process at the University of Oregon. This guide can help students filing a complaint or students accused of violating the Student Conduct Code. The University’s philosophy of student conduct is threefold: (1) to be educational, (2) to prevent future violations, and (3) to repair any harm done to the community. Whenever possible, sanctions focus on helping students learn from their mistakes and being better citizens.

  • Why is there a Student Conduct Code? The Code sets the standard of personal and organizational conduct for students and groups. However, this standard is not merely a minimum expectation but also what the University community hopes each student and group aspires to be. The Code’s main purpose is to maintain and protect an environment conducive to learning.
  • Where and when does the Code apply? In general, students are accountable for their behavior when it occurs on University property or University-sponsored event. Students may also be accountable for behavior off-campus if it involves physical violence or causes reasonable fear of physical harm.
  • So, what are the rules? The UO’s primary “rules” can be found at http://conduct.uoregon.edu (click on Student Conduct Code). They are also available in a summarized format on the opposite side of this page. Students must also follow other University policies, such as class syllabi, departmental policies, Information Services Acceptable Use Policy, and University Housing’s Residence Hall Contract.
  • What does the University do when a violation is reported? University officials determine what, if any, violations may have occurred and then notify the student(s) of the suspected violations by e-mail. The University requires students to check their University e-mail accounts daily. The student then has 14 calendar days to schedule an appointment with a hearing officer to discuss their options regarding the alleged misconduct. A hearing officer or panel may decide the student’s responsibility without the student’s input after this 14-day time limit.
  • What is the difference between student conduct violations and criminal violations? Sometimes violations can both violate the Student Conduct Code and local, state, and federal laws. However, filing a complaint with the Office of Student Conduct and Community Standards does not constitute filing a criminal complaint (or vice versa).
  • What support can a victim or affected party get? Students can seek assistance from numerous departments and organizations on campus. A good place to start is the Office of the Dean of Students, located at 164 Oregon Hall, 541.346.3216. Administrators are available for drop-in cases from 8 a.m. to noon and 1-5 p.m. on business days. The Dean of Students office has a staff member specializing in victim advocacy and other staff members who can assist with safety planning. Moreover, an advocate from the Dean of Students office can usually attend a panel hearing (if the accused student selects this option) to support the student who is a victim of a crime of violence.
  • What support can an accused student get? Accused students can get support from administrators, other faculty/staff, family, and friends. Specifically, the Office of the Dean of Students, located at 164 Oregon Hall, 541.346.3216, can assist accused students. Of course, students can get support from parents. While the Office of Student Conduct and Community Standards recognizes the parents’ goal is to provide support for their student, it asks you provide this unconditional support with encouragement to take responsibility for the student’s behaviors and to learn from the mistakes. Parents should know that there is a process in place to hear all the information regarding the incident, so parents should encourage the student to prepare for the process. Moreover, parents should ask questions that get the student to reflect on the student’s effect on the campus community.
  • What does the University do next? University officials determine what, if any, violations may have occurred and then notify the student(s) of the suspected violations by e-mail. The University requires students to check their University e-mail accounts daily. The student then has 14 calendar days to schedule an appointment with a hearing officer to discuss their options regarding the alleged misconduct. A hearing officer or panel may decide the student’s responsibility without the student’s input after this 14-day time limit.
  • What are the accused student’s choices? Students learn about their options when they meet with a hearing officer. They may choose to have their case heard in an administrative hearing (a one-on-one conference with a hearing officer) or a panel hearing (a group of faculty, staff, and students whom hear the case). In most cases, if the student selects an administrative hearing, the case is heard immediately afterward. Also, there may be additional options for students who live in or are a part of University Housing, Greek Life, and Club Sports. Moreover, if a hearing officer or panel feels it is appropriate, they may refer the student to a program known as restorative justice.
  • What support can a student get? Students can seek assistance from administrators, faculty/staff, family, or friends. A good place to start is the Office of the Dean of Students, located at 164 Oregon Hall, 541.346.3216. Staff members are available for drop-in from 8 a.m. to noon and 1-5 p.m. on business days. Student Life staff members can help a student negotiate and understand the conduct process and can usually attend a hearing for either party in a case.  However, students need to know that the support person is there to offer support, not to resolve the case; students are expected to speak for themselves and participate in the educational process.
  • What standard is applied in determining responsibility? The UO uses the “preponderance of evidence”.  This is also known as “what is more likely than not” to have occurred. This is not the same standard used in criminal cases.
  • What can parents do? Some parents’ first instinct is to solve the problem for the student. However, parents staying in the background could be an important developmental step for their student. The Office of Student Conduct and Community Standards recommends waiting 24 hours before intervening on their behalf. Parents may find they do not need to do anything and instead allow their student to learn from their mistakes, which can be one of the most valuable lessons in higher education.
  • How does the University find out about violations? Most commonly, the University officials in the Department of Public Safety and University Housing write reports when they witness violations of the Student Conduct Code. However, reports may also come from faculty/staff, greater Eugene/Springfield community members, the Eugene Police Department, and students.
  • If a student is found responsible, what are the possible sanctions? Sanctions are assigned specific to each student and are intended to be educational in nature. Sanctions may include substance abuse education courses, counseling assessments, reflection papers, educational projects, loss of privileges, or community service. Severe cases or cases in which the student violates a policy multiple times could result in eviction from the residence halls, suspension, expulsion, or negative notation on their transcript.
  • What effect does a finding of responsibility have on a student?  Students may need to explain these violations on study abroad, scholarship, employment, etc. applications, but evaluators of these applications are looking for what students have learned from their violations. Moreover, most students’ conduct records are destroyed (and therefore no longer reportable) five years after the incident date.
  • If a student is found responsible, what are the possible sanctions? Sanctions can vary because many factors apply: type of offense, severity of offense, attitude of the responsible student, etc. Common sanctions can include substance abuse education courses, counseling assessments, reflection papers, educational projects, loss of privileges, and community service. Severe cases or cases in which the student violates a policy multiple times could result in eviction from the residence halls, suspension, expulsion, or negative notation on the transcript.
  • Will the University tell parents about these violations or hearings? No. A student must specifically waive privacy (granted by the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974) and designates a person(s) to receive such information. Moreover, even after a student waives privacy, it is up to the designee(s) to inquire about the student’s conduct record—the University will not automatically inform a designee(s) of future violations.
     

Academic Integrity Resources for Students


For more information, please contact:
The Office of Student Conduct and Community Standards
164 Oregon Hall, http://conduct.uoregon.edu, 541-346-1140

Campus Resources

 Office of Student Advocacy
541-346-3722
http://uoregon.edu/~asuoosa

University Counseling and Testing Center
541-346-3227
http://counseling.uoregon.edu/dnn

University Health Center
541-346-2770
http://healthcenter.uoregon.edu

University Housing
541-346-4277
http://housing.uoregon.edu

Advisors

A student can have one advisor. The student can choose anyone to be his or her advisor. It can be a friend or family member, a UO faculty or staff member, an attorney, or a representative from Student Advocacy. An advison can assist the student in any and all steps in the conduct process.